Tag Archives: dog

Sam’s November Newsletter

5 Dec

NOVEMBER 2012

 november_newsletter

SAM SAYS:   “I went to Mt Roskill Primary Junior School.  It is a huge school and I nearly got lost, but Annie showed me the way to the classrooms.     The children were amazing, they represent so many nationalities and in every country in the world they have dogs just like me.   That’s why it is so important for you all to remember that dogs are dogs and not humans.   Remember to treat us like animals and we will feel safe, but only if you are the Pack Leader and tell us what to do”.

 sam “There’s something going on at homeI feel it for sure in every bone

Paper and boxes, Annie is packing

Piling up boxes, and lots of stacking

We’re shifting house, it’s all a bit scarey

I don’t know where I’ll sleep, I’m feeling wary.

I hope when the packers come, they take my bed

Where else can I sleep and lay down my head?

It’s only eight more sleeps till “moving time”

And we drive out.  That’s the end of this rhyme”.

 

“Dogs play “tiggy” too:

Dogs like to play “tag” just like kids do, but they play it differently.

When dogs meet, first they smell each others bottoms” – would it be polite if we did that?

Then they circle around and decide whether they like each other or not.

Once they are comfortable, they will play and chase each other.

When a new dog visits a house, the dog who lives there will want the visiting dog to know who is the BOSS.   So he will race towards the new dog and take out his legs, and knock the visiting dog down.  That is the way he is saying “Hey mate, I live here, you can visit and be my friend, but just remember this is my house”.  This makes the visiting dog feel safe and they become good friends.

Last Christmas day when Dean arrived at his sister’s house for Christmas dinner, his new dog GRIZZ (you can see his photo on this website at his 1st birthday party) was walking up to the front door, and TOYER (A German Pointer) came racing out the front door and bowled Grizz for a six.   Grizz rolled over on the grass and then, after they did the “bottom sniffing routine” they were best friends.  Now when Grizz visits Toyer, Toyer doesn’t need to “take out his legs” because Grizz remembers that “this is Toyer’s house and she is the resident dog here  on her patch”.    In fact if Dean arrives without Grizz, Toyer spends the whole time looking for Grizz, because he is her friend and sort of her “dog cousin” and she wanted him to come and play with him..

Tell us your stories, everyone has a dog story to tell,  perhaps next month I will tell you about the time a dog leapt out of the bushes in Cornwall Park and bit my bottom!!!!!!  Ouchee!!

Marj.

Director Administration.

SAM’S DOG RULES.

We are what we think

                 We feel what we think

                         What we feel gets created.

Only human beings will follow unstable Pack leaders  –  animals will not.

If you are having trouble with your dogs or children look to yourself first,

understand what energy you are in and choose accordingly.

 

Annie’s Doggy 101 teaching is great.  

Dogs learn very quickly when they know you are the Leader.

If no-one takes the authority, they will.

Then we are all in trouble.

Go the “Packleaders”.   . Write to me at  sam@samsdogrules.com   

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How to choose the right Dog for your family

25 Oct

When choosing a Dog the first question you must ask yourself is:

Why do I want a dog?

  • Do you want a dog that can train with you and go on runs?
  • Do you want a dog for companionship?
  • Do you want a dog to be a playmate for your kids?
  • Do you want a dog because you like the look of that particular breed?
  • Do you want a dog to give your love to?
  • Do you want a guard dog?

These are just a few reasons as to why you may want to have a dog in your life.

Most of us will choose a dog to fulfill a need in ourselves and there is nothing wrong with that. But if you want to have a dog that fits in with you and your family’s needs you must put the dogs needs before your own. This is to give yourself the best chance of having a happy relationship between you and your dog.

Are you a person or family that has high energy? Love being out and about? Love walking, running, playing sports and riding bikes? If you’re happy to have your dog come on runs twice a day, then you’ll want a dog that has high energy. Having a dog that has medium to low energy levels will not contribute to your family in the way you would like.  You will want to go run/ play and he just hasn’t got the energy to keep up with you.  You will become disappointed with a medium to low energy dog in your family.

Likewise, if you are a family that love hanging out on the couch and going for an easy walk once a day, having a high energy dog in your family will drive you insane. They will get up to mischief, become destructive, chew your shoes, walls…you get the picture.  If this high energy dog’s needs are not being met, frustration will be the only outcome for you and for your dog. Not the reason you chose to have a dog in the family.

So ask yourself the important questions:

Good Manners when walking your Dog: Part 1

7 Oct

Written by: Annie Aubrey

For all of you out there with a “reactive Dog “ let me assure you, your dog is only reactive because you’re reactive.  However this isn’t an issue that can’t be fixed.  You need to start with what you’re thinking.

Your feelings follow what you’re thinking and your body will react to your feelings. This gives off energy. It is this energy that our dogs sense and react to.  It takes practice to constantly be aware of our thoughts, especially when walking our dogs, this is called being present.

Confident Pack Leaders, need to be able to recognize that reactive owners and their dogs,  need space to feel safe. But, anxious owners also need to realize when we call out “our dog is safe,” that they can let go of their anxiety and relax. If a dog perceives its owner to be anxious, the dog will attempt to take over as Pack Leader and may become aggressive to defend them.

Your dog needs a Pack Leader, being in an anxious state isn’t giving off Pack Leader energy, so your dog takes over.

We now have an anxious owner with an anxious dog, who is trying to be Pack Leader.

Your dog’s leadership is unstable. With unstable energy anything can happen and meeting another dog or another anxious owner and dog could lead to an unpleasant encounter.

Dogs being pack animals will only trust, respect and follow the guidance of a Pack Leader. Human Beings are the only pack animal that will follow unstable Pack Leaders.

It  then becomes the responsibility of confident Pack Leaders  to recognize and react accordingly to both “reactive” owners and their dogs.  If you see an anxious dog owner approaching then it is up to you, as Pack Leader to protect not only your own dog, but also the other owner and their dog.  You cannot control their behaviour, but you do have control over you and your dog’s behaviour. By being a strong Pack Leader your dog will trust your decision to walk on by.

As a confident Pack Leader it is your responsibility to recognize reactive owners and their dogs and give them the space they need. By simply doing this you will allow them to build up confidence with their dog. The result of this, is that as they gain confidence as dog owners, their anxiety may subside and they could become stronger Pack Leaders. This will result in  their dogs feeling the difference in their energy and becoming calmer.

Therefore we must have compassion and respect reactive owners and their dogs.  Do not judge them, if they ask you to call your dog, do not take it personally. You know your dog is safe, they don’t. Respect their wishes, call your dog and move on. By giving these people and their dogs this much needed space they get the opportunity to master their own energy.

Remember being a Pack Leader is a moment by moment thing and even the best Pack Leader can become a reactive owner within seconds if they have a negative or fearful thought. Achieving Mastery of ourselves is the aim.

Happy Birthday Grizz!

29 Aug

 

Sam’s friend Grizz had his 1st birthday and he loved his cake, but he should not be eating chocolate so his family helped him out.

Happy birthday Grizz from all of us at Sam’s Dog Rules and a big friendly happy birthday WOOF! from Sam.

Sam's Dog Rules - Sam's friend Grizz celebrates his first birthday

Grizz and his birthday cake

11,708 reported dog attacks on New Zealanders last year!*

17 Jun
Annie, Sam and Kids - Sam's Dog Rules - No Look, No Talk, No Touch

Sam holding court

*NZ ACC – NZ Herald – 25 January 2012

With a New Zealand average of more than 30 dog bites per day, Annie and Marj, founders of Sam’s Dog Rules, passionately believe there is an urgent need for Sam’s Dog Rules education to be made available to all New Zealand children and families.

A lack of knowledge of the language that dogs understand and respond to has led to significant levels of trauma in the lives of children in New Zealand, and brought about the unnecessary destruction of thousands of dogs, that could otherwise have been avoided.

Sam’s Dog Rules will make a difference!

Sam's Dog Rules - No Look, No Talk, No Touch

Practising No Look! means Sam feels safe to check you out.

Sam's Dog Rules - No Look, No Talk, No Touch

Practising No Look, No Talk, No Touch rules

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